Ms. Bookish

Jul 12

“Avoid small graceless movements. As much as possible free yourself from useless and clumsy statements about action. “They got in the car and drove home” is surely too much ground to cover in one short simple sentence; assuming that your characters did get into the car and did have to drive home, you have just the same wasted a point where your action might work for your story; let the process of their getting home be an unobtrusive factor in another, more important action: “On their way home in the car they saw that the boy and the girl were still standing talking earnestly on the corner.” Let each such potentially awkward spot contribute to your total action.” — Shirley Jackson, “Notes For a Young Writer”

Jul 05

“Occasionally he wouldn’t know what happened next so he would put the story away, once for as long as four years. It was written in fits and starts, in multi-page chunks, or in fifty-word bursts on train journeys - whenever he knew what happened next.” — Neil Gaiman on the writing of CORALINE, from THE ART OF NEIL GAIMAN, by Hayley Campbell

Jun 27

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May 21

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May 20

"“Without warning, a lone driver plows through the crowd in a stolen Mercedes, running over the innocent, backing up, and charging again. Eight people are killed; fifteen are wounded. The killer escapes. In another part of town, months later, a retired cop named Bill Hodges is still haunted by the unsolved crime. When he gets a crazed letter from someone who self-identifies as the “perk” and threatens an even more diabolical attack, Hodges wakes up from his depressed and vacant retirement, hell-bent on preventing another tragedy.”" (via Stephen King’s New Novel to Publish June 3rd - GalleyCat)

"“Without warning, a lone driver plows through the crowd in a stolen Mercedes, running over the innocent, backing up, and charging again. Eight people are killed; fifteen are wounded. The killer escapes. In another part of town, months later, a retired cop named Bill Hodges is still haunted by the unsolved crime. When he gets a crazed letter from someone who self-identifies as the “perk” and threatens an even more diabolical attack, Hodges wakes up from his depressed and vacant retirement, hell-bent on preventing another tragedy.”" (via Stephen King’s New Novel to Publish June 3rd - GalleyCat)

“The only danger to horror or literature, it seems to me, is the assumption that they are separate or opposing things. That literature can’t be rebellious. That dark fiction can’t be gorgeous and hurtful and heartfelt and life-affirming.” — Is Horror Literature? by Glen Hirshberg

May 19

(Source: listentothestories)

“Do what you feel in your heart to be right – for you’ll be criticized anyway.” —

Eleanor Roosevelt

Book Geek Quotes #488

(via wilwheaton)

(Source: bookgeekconfessions, via wilwheaton)

“The artist doesn’t have to be suffering to portray suffering, he just has to UNDERSTAND suffering.” — David Lynch (via austinkleon)

Jan 27

“From a very early age, perhaps the age of five or six, I knew that when I grew up I should be a writer. Between the ages of about seventeen and twenty-four I tried to abandon this idea, but I did so with the consciousness that I was outraging my true nature and that sooner or later I should have to settle down and write books.” — George Orwell, from Why We Write, by Meredith Maran