4:20 pm - Wed, Jul 23, 2014
1 note
Writing is at its best - always, always, always - when it is a kind of inspired play for the writer.
Stephen King, ON WRITING


12:40 pm
Once I start work on a project, I don’t stop and I don’t slow down unless I absolutely have to. If I don’t write every day, the characters begin to stale off in my mind - they begin to seem like characters instead of real people. The tale’s narrative cutting edge starts to rust and I begin to lose my hold on the story’s plot and pace. Worst of all, the excitement of spinning something new begins to fade. The work starts to feel like work, and for most writers that is the smooch of death.
Stephen King, ON WRITING


4:20 pm - Tue, Jul 22, 2014
The real importance of reading is that it creates an ease and intimacy with the process of writing; one comes to the country of the writer with one’s papers and identification pretty much in order. Constant reading will pull you into a place (a mind-set, if you like the phrase) where you can write eagerly and without self-consciousness.
Stephen King, ON WRITING


12:40 pm
3 notes
Reading is the creative center of a writer’s life.
Stephen King, ON WRITING


12:40 pm - Sat, Jul 12, 2014
Avoid small graceless movements. As much as possible free yourself from useless and clumsy statements about action. “They got in the car and drove home” is surely too much ground to cover in one short simple sentence; assuming that your characters did get into the car and did have to drive home, you have just the same wasted a point where your action might work for your story; let the process of their getting home be an unobtrusive factor in another, more important action: “On their way home in the car they saw that the boy and the girl were still standing talking earnestly on the corner.” Let each such potentially awkward spot contribute to your total action.
Shirley Jackson, “Notes For a Young Writer”


12:40 pm - Sat, Jul 5, 2014
1 note
Occasionally he wouldn’t know what happened next so he would put the story away, once for as long as four years. It was written in fits and starts, in multi-page chunks, or in fifty-word bursts on train journeys - whenever he knew what happened next.
Neil Gaiman on the writing of CORALINE, from THE ART OF NEIL GAIMAN, by Hayley Campbell


10:05 pm - Fri, Jun 27, 2014
1,394 notes

austinkleon:

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

Regard the notebooks of Paul Klee

Sincerely,

Professor Chewbacca

design-is-fine:

Paul Klee, Beiträge zur bildnerischen Formlehre, 1922. Bauhaus Weimar.

More PDFs of his notebooks over at Monoskop.

Filed under: Paul Klee

(Source: elisavafreb.wordpress.com)



12:41 pm - Wed, May 21, 2014
62 notes

austinkleon:

Lynda Barry’s first solo show in NYC this summer

thenearsightedmonkey:

Where on earth is Professor Chewbacca?

On May 13th she’ll be using her earth name (Lynda Barry) and will be at an opening for an exhibition of her work in New York from 6pm to 8pm at the Adam Baumgold Gallery — 60 east 66th street, NYC NY just in case you are in the neighborhood, come on over!  The exhibition is #5 on the “what to do” list in New York Magazine.http://nymag.com/arts/all/to-do-2014-5-5/

Can you dig it? We KNEW that you COULD!

Oh, jeez. Now I have to get a plane ticket to NYC. You can see a bunch of the pieces at Adam Baumgold Gallery’s website.

Filed under: Lynda Barry



4:20 pm - Tue, May 20, 2014
2 notes
"“Without warning, a lone driver plows through the crowd in a stolen Mercedes, running over the innocent, backing up, and charging again. Eight people are killed; fifteen are wounded. The killer escapes. In another part of town, months later, a retired cop named Bill Hodges is still haunted by the unsolved crime. When he gets a crazed letter from someone who self-identifies as the “perk” and threatens an even more diabolical attack, Hodges wakes up from his depressed and vacant retirement, hell-bent on preventing another tragedy.”" (via Stephen King’s New Novel to Publish June 3rd - GalleyCat)

"“Without warning, a lone driver plows through the crowd in a stolen Mercedes, running over the innocent, backing up, and charging again. Eight people are killed; fifteen are wounded. The killer escapes. In another part of town, months later, a retired cop named Bill Hodges is still haunted by the unsolved crime. When he gets a crazed letter from someone who self-identifies as the “perk” and threatens an even more diabolical attack, Hodges wakes up from his depressed and vacant retirement, hell-bent on preventing another tragedy.”" (via Stephen King’s New Novel to Publish June 3rd - GalleyCat)



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12:40 pm
The only danger to horror or literature, it seems to me, is the assumption that they are separate or opposing things. That literature can’t be rebellious. That dark fiction can’t be gorgeous and hurtful and heartfelt and life-affirming.


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